Executive commissioning nurses

NHS Clinical Commissioners has produced an infographic showcasing the expertise and insight that executive commissioning nurses can bring for patients, populations and the system, which will be crucial to implementing patient centred care as the NHS moves towards integrated place-based planning

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Image source: http://www.nhscc.org

Since their establishment, CCGs have been required to include a registered nurse on their governing body to expand the clinical knowledge and patient experience of the board. Many CCGs have expanded this role in recognition of the contribution that executive nurses embedded full-time in the day to day decision making of the CCG can make.

Developed by the NHSCC Nurses’ Forum and based on interviews with its members, the infographic highlights five areas in which executive commissioning nurses bring value:

  • Assuring the quality of services
  • Driving cross-organisational relationships
  • Highlighting the patient experience of service delivery
  • Providing leadership for nurses across the local area
  • Providing a commissioning voice for the largest profession in the NHS

Full detail at NHS Clinical Commissioners

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Nurse involvement in commissioning can bring experience to pathways of care

Nursing Times | June 2018 | ‘Nurse involvement in commissioning can bring experience to pathways of care’

A new piece in Nursing Times outlines the benefits of nurse involvement in commissoning.  Lynnette Glass,  quality lead for projects, Swindon Clinical Commissioning Group highlights how nurse involvement in commissioning “can bring a breadth of experience to pathways of care, resulting in patient safety assurance and peer-to-peer conversations at all levels between the CCG and providers that are not just based on statistics but include frontline experience.” (Source: Nursing Times)

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The full article is available from Nursing Times 

The Role of Nurses in Alcohol and Drug Treatment Services

Guidance for commissioners, providers and clinicians on the roles of nurses in alcohol and drug treatment in England. | Public Health England

This resource describes the many potential roles of nurses in alcohol and drug treatment in England to help commissioners and providers of specialist adult alcohol and drug treatment services to recruit the right workforce to meet local needs.

The document outlines:

  • The roles of nurses working in alcohol and drug treatment including the contribution they can make to health and social care outcomes
  • The added value nurses can bring to alcohol and drug treatment
  • The competences and skills that should be expected of nurses working in alcohol and drug treatment
  • What is required to develop and maintain these competences

Full document: The Role of Nurses in Alcohol and Drug Treatment Services:  A resource for commissioners, providers and clinicians

The Recruitment, Retention And Return Of Nurses To General Practice Nursing In England

This report, authored by Ipsos MORI, outlines the findings of qualitative research into the drivers and barriers to entry into general practice nursing (GPN) | NHS England

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It finds that the general perception is that general practice is more suitable for older or more experienced nurses. As student placements in general practice are rare, there is a lack of opportunity for students to develop an understanding of the GPN role. The research also highlights the need for greater support for GPNs and the lack of standardisation in pay for GPN roles.

General Practice Nursing – Developing confidence, capability and capacity

This Ten Point Action Plan for General Practice Nursing, describes the nursing element of the General Practice Forward View (GPFV) | NHS England

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The GPN ten point action plan sets out the measures required to bring about the changes that are needed, which will be taken forward by NHS England, Health Education England, NHS Improvement, Public Health England, The Royal College of Nursing, The Royal College of General Practitioners, The Queens Nursing Institute and The British Medical Association. These organisations will support commissioners and providers to implement the actions at local level. Delivery of this Ten Point Action Plan at a local level will be supported by one of four Regional GPN Delivery Boards.

General practice at scale and new care models provide fresh opportunities for supporting general practice nurses to develop skills and advance their careers. This will assist recruitment and retention which will in turn ease GPs’ workload as well as improving the experience of care for individuals, the outcomes of care and treatment, the use of NHS resources and staff experience.

New report aims to make General Practice Nursing a top career destination

Improving training available in GP practice settings and raising the profile of the role  is key to helping to retain and expand the General Practice Nursing (GPN) workforce | Health Education England.

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Image source: HEE

Key report recommendations include:

  • improving training capacity for the general practice nurse workforce by providing access to accredited training to equip them for each level of their role;
  • raising the profile of general practice nursing, to increase the uptake of the role as a first-destination career;
  • developing GPN educator roles to cover all CCG areas, including the promotion of mentor training for all GPNs  to retain the knowledge and expertise of existing GPNs; and
  • the development of a sustainable and easily accessible ‘how-to’ toolkit and web based resource to support the implementation of general practice nursing workforce initiatives.
  • a nationwide standardised general practice nursing ‘return to practice’ education programme which includes a general practice placement, mentorship and appropriate support to meet the NMC requirements for ‘return to practice’.

Read the full report here

School nurse toolkit: Evaluation of behaviour change interventions

School nurses are key professionals in delivering evidence-based public health
programmes and interventions to support children and young people achieve best
health outcomes | Public Health England

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Evidence suggests that although school nurse interventions result in a variety of positive
outcomes there is a lack of formal and robust evaluation activities. This toolkit is for school nurses who are undertaking interventions to support behaviour change in children or young people. It takes a realistic approach that can be integrated into practice. Whilst there is no single way of doing evaluation, and there is no ‘one size fits all’ approach to evaluation, this toolkit provides a guide to the processes and tools to use to evaluate the work you deliver.

View the full toolkit here