New report aims to make General Practice Nursing a top career destination

Improving training available in GP practice settings and raising the profile of the role  is key to helping to retain and expand the General Practice Nursing (GPN) workforce | Health Education England.

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Image source: HEE

Key report recommendations include:

  • improving training capacity for the general practice nurse workforce by providing access to accredited training to equip them for each level of their role;
  • raising the profile of general practice nursing, to increase the uptake of the role as a first-destination career;
  • developing GPN educator roles to cover all CCG areas, including the promotion of mentor training for all GPNs  to retain the knowledge and expertise of existing GPNs; and
  • the development of a sustainable and easily accessible ‘how-to’ toolkit and web based resource to support the implementation of general practice nursing workforce initiatives.
  • a nationwide standardised general practice nursing ‘return to practice’ education programme which includes a general practice placement, mentorship and appropriate support to meet the NMC requirements for ‘return to practice’.

Read the full report here

School nurse toolkit: Evaluation of behaviour change interventions

School nurses are key professionals in delivering evidence-based public health
programmes and interventions to support children and young people achieve best
health outcomes | Public Health England

Obesity - A Positive Lifestyle

Evidence suggests that although school nurse interventions result in a variety of positive
outcomes there is a lack of formal and robust evaluation activities. This toolkit is for school nurses who are undertaking interventions to support behaviour change in children or young people. It takes a realistic approach that can be integrated into practice. Whilst there is no single way of doing evaluation, and there is no ‘one size fits all’ approach to evaluation, this toolkit provides a guide to the processes and tools to use to evaluate the work you deliver.

View the full toolkit here

GPs and practice nurses aren’t getting enough mental health training

New statistics from Mind highlight how little training GPs and practice nurses are being offered in mental health.

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Image source: Mind

Data obtained by the mental health charity shows that in England, on average, less than half (46 per cent) of trainee GPs undertook a training placement in a mental health setting.

Furthermore, the only mental health-related option offered to trainee GPs was in psychiatry, which is based in hospitals and secondary care-focussed.

Once qualified, GPs are required to undertake ongoing training in order to continue to practice, but, at the moment, none of the hours they spend on Continued Professional Development (CPD) need to have a mental-health component. This is despite an estimated one in three GP appointments being related to mental health.

Practice nurses are being let down too. More than four in five (82 per cent) practice nurses said they feel ill-equipped to deal with aspects of mental health for which they’re responsible. More than two in five (42 per cent) said they’d had no mental health training at all.

The vast majority of people with mental health problems who do get treatment are seen within primary care – 81 per cent of people first come into contact with mental health services via their GP, with 90 per cent of people receiving treatment and care for their mental health problem solely in primary care settings.

Read the full report here

The role of the nurse on the CCG governing body

New NHSCC report shows the impact that CCG nurses are making locally |NHS Clinical Commissioners

This report highlights how the role of nurses on a CCG’s governing body has changed over time, empowering them to make more of a difference for their local patients and populations.

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Image source: http://www.nhscc.org/

It reveals how many CCGs are now employing full time chief or executive nurses with responsibility for the day-to-day running of an element of the organisation, going beyond the legal requirement for a registered nurse to sit on their governing body.

The report illustrates the impact that commissioning nurses are making locally, such as reducing rates of smoking in pregnancy, providing a voice for practice nurses and leading local service development. It also makes recommendations for national organisations and CCGs themselves on how they can support the commissioning nurse to be as effective as possible.