Excellence In Diabetes Care Commissioning

NHSCC launch new report on excellence in diabetes care commissioning | NHSCC

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Image source: NHSCC

The document draws out lessons from those involved in the projects to share and embed for the future. Since 1996 the number of people living with diabetes in the UK has more than doubled. The NHS is now spending more than £9.8bn each year on treating the condition and its complications.

The new report Excellence in commissioning diabetes care features a range of programmes from CCGs across the country with case studies including:

  • Slough CCG’s approach involving both targeted support for communities and education in GP practices – the CCG is ranked second best in the country on delivering the eight care processes identified by the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence as representing good practice in diabetes care.
  • Surrey Downs CCG’s work to improve communication between GP practices and paramedics in relation to incidences of hypoglycaemia.
  • Aylesbury Vale and Chiltern CCGs’ joint approach to diabetes care, which focuses on what the patient wants to achieve rather than only their blood sugar levels.

The report is available to download here

The Impact of Walk-in Centres and GP Co-operatives on Emergency Department Presentations

Crawford, J. et al. International Emergency Nursing | Published online: 18 April 2017

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Image source: Kake – Flickr // CC BY-NC-SA 2.0

Highlights:

  • Workload and resource pressures on EDs require the development of applicable minor illness and injury pathways.
  • Walk-in-centres have the potential to reduce ED workloads but more work is required to substantiate this pathway.
  • GP cooperatives can reduce ED workloads but further evidence is required to be confident of the efficacy of this care pathway.

Read the full abstract here

NHS England Dementia: Good Care Planning

Care planning is crucial in delivering improved care for people living with dementia, and supporting their families and carers | NHS England

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Image source: NHS England

he importance of having a high quality care plan that is reviewed regularly is reiterated through its inclusion in the CCG IAF as one of the dementia indicators. It also forms a key part of the forthcoming evidence-based treatment pathway for dementia.

Simply having a care plan, whilst being a good start, is not enough. Any care plan needs to be personalised to the specific needs of each person with dementia and reflect changes in their care needs over time. To support the adoption of high-quality care plans NHS England has developed a guide Dementia: Good Care Planning, with input from people living with dementia, their carers and health and social care professionals.

View the full range of resources here

New care models: now available in GP-friendly packages

There are a number of reasons for general practice to change – it is often small and called inefficient, with wide variations in quality from one practice to the next | PCC

There are also things GPs and patients are desperate not to change – general practice is local, personal and often delivers exceptional care as well as excellent value for money for taxpayers.

The scaled up version of general practice imagined by policymakers makes complete sense: organisations big enough to cope with changes in demand, able to expand the range of services they provide, able to benefit from economies of scale, and able to make more creative use of the wider primary care clinical workforce to free GP time and add value for patients.

However logical or inevitable big general practice may appear, practices are left with a number of questions:

  • How do we grow big without losing the benefits of being small?
  • What are the longer term gains and what might we have to give up for them?
  • How do we retain a voice in the new bigger enterprise?
  • How practical is it to share patients and workforce?
  • How do we bring patients along with us?
  • What about governance – who is ultimately responsible for care when patient lists are shared?

And the biggest question of all: how do we find time to make the changes we need to make when we’ve never been busier?

Read the full article here

Quality improvement: learning from innovations in the vanguards

The King’s Fund Blog | By Don Berwick

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I have recently returned from an exciting, whirlwind tour of another set of new care models sites. This was my fourth such tour. My goal for these visits, which I make as an International Visiting Fellow for The King’s Fund, is to attempt to understand what the vanguard organisations are trying to do, how well they are faring, and how they might progress even better and faster. On this trip, the additional question was: ‘How can these lessons and models be spread more widely across the NHS?’

Read the full blog post here

What’s New in Care Models: NHS England’s MCP flotilla

Tracking everything that’s new in care models and progress of the Five Year Forward View | By HSJ’s integration reporter David Williams.

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Late last year NHS England launched a great flotilla of new papers on MCPs (“a raft” doesn’t quite do justice to the sheer scale of the release), providing lots of significant new detail on how the new providers will be constituted and contracted.

The documents include the draft contract, a lot of things explaining what the contract means, a template alliance agreement for people who don’t want to go the whole hog, and a couple of papers aimed at GPs who might be considering getting involved.

Read the full news story here

NHS England announces £101 million of new funding for new care model vanguards

£101 million of new funding to support and spread the work of the new care model vanguards | NHS England

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The vanguards are partnerships of NHS, local government, voluntary, community and other organisations that are implementing plans to improve the healthcare people receive, prevent ill health and save funds.

Considerable progress has been made since the vanguards were launched in 2015 and there is emerging evidence that they are making significant improvements at a local level. This includes reducing pressure on busy GP and A&E services.

In addition to the funding, the vanguards will continue to receive support from NHS England and other national bodies to implement their plans, including how they harness new technology including apps and shared computer systems. They are also receiving help to develop their workforce so that it is organised around patients and their local populations.

Read the full overview here