Nearly six in ten CCGs missing talking therapies targets

Almost six in ten clinical commissioning groups are missing targets on access to talking therapies, according to official figures | OnMedica

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Mental health charity Mind said this morning that the “unacceptable” figures reflect years of mental health services being “woefully underfunded”, and insisted that it is vital that quality, timely services must be in place to meet increasing demand.

Mind said the new data, from NHS England’s mental health dashboard on how CCGs are performing with regard to delivering talking therapies, highlight the proportion of CCGs meeting and missing their targets. These most recent available data, which are for Q3 (October-December) 2016, showed that 120 out of 209 CCGs in England (57%) are failing to meet the target for the proportion of people in their area that should be accessing talking therapies – currently set at 15.8% of the local population who have been identified as being able to benefit from talking therapies. By 2021, this target is set to rise to 25%.

The figures also revealed that barely half (52%) of CCGs met the recovery rate target for talking therapies – 101 out of 209 CCGs missed the current recovery target, which is set at 50%.

Mind pointed out that these data specifically focus on therapies available through the Improving Access to Psychological Therapies (IAPT) programme, which is supposed to increase accessibility of talking treatments to those identified as potentially benefitting from receiving them (typically, people with common mental health problems such as depression and anxiety disorder).

Improving Deaf people’s access to mental health services

As many as two in three Deaf people in the UK struggle with mental health problems, but most find it too difficult to access psychological therapy.

Guidance for commissioners of primary care mental health services for deaf people from the Joint Commissioning Panel for Mental Health (JCPMH) and Deaf health charity SignHealth, calls for improvement to deaf people’s access to mental health services.

Despite having poorer mental health than the rest of the population, the 60,000 people across the UK who use sign language as their main language often come up against barriers when seeking mental health services.

The guide’s recommendations for commissioners of primary mental health services could make a dramatic change to the mental health of many Deaf people.

Provision of community care: who, what, how much?

This briefing from the Health Foundation analyses information on the community care contracts held by 78 per cent of CCGs in England to enable better understanding of the provision of these services. It finds that NHS providers hold more than half of the total annual value of contracts in the sample, while private providers held 5 per cent of the total annual value, but 39 per cent of the total number of contracts issued.

Full briefing available here

GPs struggle to support patients sent far from home for mental healthcare

GPs warn they are struggling to support young patients with mental illness after BMA research found seven in 10 children and adolescents with severe mental health problems were admitted to hospitals outside their local area | GPonline

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A total of 69% of child and adolescent admissions for severe mental health issues in 2016/17 were classed as ‘out of area’, according to data obtained from hospitals by the BMA.

Figures obtained under the Freedom of Information Act show that the proportion of children admitted to hospital out of their area rose 12 percentage points in 2016/17 compared with the previous year.

The BMA warned that the figures – published to coincide with Mental Health Awareness Week – showed worsening access to specialist beds.

Read the full article here

GPs are failing people with eating disorders, says charity

Half of people with experience of condition rate GPs’ care as poor, survey finds | The Guardian

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GPs are routinely failing to provide adequate care to patients with eating disorders, with one in three not referred for specialist assistance, a leading charity has warned.

Beat, the UK’s primary eating disorder charity, found that half of people with some experience of the condition rated GP care as “poor” or “very poor” and 30% were not referred to mental health services after their appointment.

The charity polled 1,700 people, the majority of whom had sought medical help for an eating disorder. Of the 1,267 who had gone to a GP for help, only 34% said they felt their doctor knew how to treat them.

Read the full news story here

Read the survey results from Beat here

Commissioning for Value mental health and dementia packs

NHS RightCare has published new data packs for a range of mental health and dementia services for each CCG.

NHS RightCare has published new Commissioning for Value mental health and dementia packs for each CCG. The packs contain data across a range of mental health and dementia services, and include a number of new indicators not included in previous packs. The information is intended to support discussions about mental health care in local health economies to improve the value and utilisation of resources.

 Rotherham CCG Commissioning for Value Mental health and dementia pack:

Support after a suicide: a guide to providing local services

Support after a suicide: a guide to providing local services | Public Health England

This practical guidance helps commissioners understand why and how they can deliver support after suicide (also known as postvention support) in their local areas.

The National Suicide Prevention Alliance (NSPA) has published further guidance on:

suicide

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