People with co-occurring conditions: commission and provide services

Better care for people with co-occurring mental health and alcohol/drug use conditions: A guide for commissioners and service providers | Public Health England

This Public Health England (PHE) guide, developed with the support of NHS England,  should be used by the commissioners and providers of mental health and alcohol and drug treatment services, to inform the commissioning and provision of effective care for people with co-occurring mental health and alcohol/drug use conditions. It also has relevance for all other services that have contact with people with co-occurring conditions, including people experiencing mental health crisis.

The guidance has been co-produced with members of the expert reference group for co-existing substance misuse with mental health issues, and in consultation with experts through experience, service providers, practitioners, commissioners and policy leads.

It aims to support local areas to commission timely and effective responses for people
with co-occurring conditions. It encourages commissioners and service providers to
work together to improve access to services which can reduce harm, improve health
and enhance recovery, enabling services to respond effectively and flexibly to
presenting needs and prevent exclusion.

Full document available via Public Health England

Preventing drug misuse deaths

Public Health England has published Health matters: preventing drug misuse deaths.

risk-factors-online

Image source: http://www.gov.uk/

There were 2,300 drug misuse deaths registered in England in 2015. This represents an increase of 8.5% on the year before and the highest figure on record.

This guidance outlines how providers and commissioners can prevent deaths from drug abuse.  It sets out the scale of the problem, factors causing the rise in drug misuse deaths, preventing drug misuse deaths and a call for action for local authorities and the NHS.

The Office for National Statistics publishes data on deaths from drug poisonings in England and Wales and is broken down by cause of death, sex, age and substances involved in the death.

Tools for assessing value for money for alcohol and drug treatment

Public Health England Blog. Published online: 25 July 2016

In 2014-15 there were 295,244 adults in alcohol and drug treatment services across England.

The latest official statistics on drug-related deaths in England showed the highest number of substance misuse related death since these records began and highlights a worrying rise in the number of older, more vulnerable drug users dying from heroin overdose.

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Image source: Sean Stephens – Flickr // CC BY-NC 2.0

PHE economic tools

PHE produces several tools to help Local Authorities and public health commissioning teams understand and inform their spending. Different tools are useful for different purposes and it’s important to know which one to use to get the most out of them.

For example, the SPOT (Spend and Outcome Tool) provides a broad overview of spend against a selection of relevant outcomes, allowing local authorities to make comparisons across some public health interventions.

Whilst is if often used by Health and Wellbeing boards and councillors, providing a high-level overview of spend and outcomes, it does not estimate value for money or return on investment.

The alcohol and drugs Value for Money tools bring together a range of tools to support local authorities, specifically alcohol and drugs commissioners, to explore ways in which the existing substance misuse budget can be spent to maximise cost-effectiveness.

Alcohol and Drugs Commissioning Tool

Developed by our Drugs and Tobacco team, this tool supports areas in understanding and improving cost-effectiveness. The Cost Calculator helps commissioners estimate local spend and unit costs, while the cost-effectiveness section helps answer a variety of questions on treatment interventions and the use of existing resources.

The Tool compares spend on the treatment system with outcomes of different types of treatments accessed by opiate users, non-opiate users and alcohol only (i.e. leaving treatment free of substance(s) of dependency).

Read the full blog post here

Service User Involvement: a guide for drug and alcohol commissioners, providers and service users

King’s Fund Health Management and Policy Alert

This guide captures some of the progress made over the last decade in service user involvement, and confirms that it remains a priority, making suggestions for local service development and recommendations about how best practice may be identified, replicated and built upon. It describes 4 different levels of service user involvement, from co-developing one’s own care plan through to initiating and running recovery-focused enterprises. The guide showcases a number of examples of unique services from across the country that have been set-up by, or run by, former alcohol and drug users.

via Health Management and Policy Alert: Service user involvement: a guide for drug and alcohol commissioners, providers and service users.