Provision of community care: who, what, how much?

This briefing from the Health Foundation analyses information on the community care contracts held by 78 per cent of CCGs in England to enable better understanding of the provision of these services. It finds that NHS providers hold more than half of the total annual value of contracts in the sample, while private providers held 5 per cent of the total annual value, but 39 per cent of the total number of contracts issued.

Full briefing available here

2017/18 NHS standard contract

The NHS Standard Contract is mandated by NHS England for use by commissioners for all contracts for healthcare services other than primary care.

nhs-contract

Image source: NHS England

The Contract (in full-length and shorter-form versions) has now been updated from the 2016/17 to the 2017/18 – 2018/19 version. A summary of the changes we have made to the Contracts can be found in section 3 of the NHS Standard Contract Technical Guidance and in the Summary of key changes documents below.

The full –length NHS Standard Contract 2017/18-2018/19 comprises three parts:

The NHS shorter-form Contract 2017/18-2018/19 also comprises three parts:

Read the full NHS Standard Contract 2017/18 and 2018/19 Technical Guidance here

Read the full overview here

Options for selecting providers and awarding contracts

NHS Improvement guide: How to secure good outcomes for patients when awarding contracts

This guide supports CCGs to make good decisions by clarifying what they need to do when selecting providers and awarding contracts. It should be read in conjunction with guidance previously issued by Monitor and the Cabinet Office, as well as forthcoming guidance from the Department of Health on requirements from recent changes to general procurement law.

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Image source: improvement.nhs.uk/

Related content: Procurement, patient choice and competition regulations

‘Not true’ that CCGs must always use competitive tenders, says regulator

Williams, D. HSJ. Published online: 20 May 2016

  • NHS Improvement issues procurement guidance to CCGs
  • Briefing note confirms new EU rules will force new contracts to be advertised
  • Regulator emphasises alternatives to competitive tendering

NHS Improvement has told commissioners that competitive tenders are not always needed to choose a provider, following the introduction of a strict new EU procurement regime.

The regulator sent a briefing note to clinical commissioning groups late last week on selecting providers and awarding contracts.

The document, seen by HSJ, confirms that CCGs will be required to advertise new contracts and extensions or variations of existing contracts. This is the result of new EU procurement rules, which have applied to the NHS since April.

It adds that where CCGs receive a number of responses they should not discriminate between providers, and should run a process that enables them to select the best bid.

However, the letter says: “It is not true that all contracts must be awarded using a competitive tender process. There are lots of ways of [selecting a provider], including through an open process or by negotiation.”

Read the full article here

CCGs could face tighter scrutiny when tendering big contracts

Illman, J. HSJ. Published online 11 March 2016.

  • NHS England probe into UnitingCare collapse likely to recommend “proactive assurance” around large contracts
  • Regional director suggested the £725m deal structure was too complicated
  • NHS England probe will give a “definitive answer” on Strategic Projects Team’s role in the deal
  • Monitor director says regulator wanted more time to sign off doomed deal

 

An NHS England probe into the collapse of the £725m UnitingCare contract is likely to recommend clinical commissioning groups tendering large contracts should face far more robust scrutiny, a senior director has said.

Paul Watson, NHS England’s Midlands and East regional director, was giving evidence to a council health committee hearing on the controversial Cambridgeshire older people’s services contract, which collapsed in December, on Thursday.

The contract tendered by Cambridgeshire and Peterborough Clinical Commissioning Group was one of the largest deals ever awarded for NHS clinical services and collapsed just eight months into the five year deal.

The hearing came on the same day an internal review published by the CCG’s auditors laid bare the depth of disagreement about the cost of running the contract between commissioners and the NHS owned provider, UnitingCare Partnership.

Read the full article here