Cancer screening: informed consent

Public Health England has updated the Cancer Screening: Informed consent guidelines.

These guidelines give commissioners, providers and healthcare professionals in cancer screening information on consent to screening and procedures.

The document covers information and advice on:

  • breast screening
  • cervical screening
  • bowel cancer screening
  • mental capacity and consent

It also provides several template letters for patients withdrawing from programmes.

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Cancer in the West Midlands

This report provides an overview of the burden of cancer and the extent of the identified risk factors, across the West Midlands. | Public Health England

The aim of this report is to equip care providers and policy makers with an insight into the burden of cancer, as well as providing an overview of the extent of the identified risk factors, across the West Midlands population.

It is intended to be used by commissioners of health services to enable more timely diagnosis and improve treatment pathways, and also by local authority commissioners in terms of the wider prevention agenda.

Full document:  Cancer in the West Midlands.

 

Cancer app developed by GPs being trialled by CCGs

A GP-developed app aiming to help GPs navigate the tests and urgent referrals necessary for patients presenting with cancer symptoms is being trialled by two CCGs | Pulse

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C the Signs was co-founded by newly qualified GP Dr Bhavagaya Bakshi and fellow doctor Miles Payling and quickly checks symptoms of more than 200 cancers against multiple diagnostic referral pathways.

Last week the app won the People’s award at the Tech4Good awards and is now set to be trialled with GPs in the East of England to test its real world cost and clinical effectiveness.

Read the full news story here

Immediate chest X-ray for patients at risk of lung cancer presenting in primary care

Neal, R.D. et al. (2017) British Journal of Cancer. 116, pp. 293-302

AS0000184F07 Hospital doctors looking at X-ray of lungs

Image source: Anthea Sieveking – Wellcome Images // CC BY-NC-ND 4.0

Background: Achieving earlier stage diagnosis is one option for improving lung cancer outcomes in the United Kingdom. Patients with lung cancer typically present with symptoms to general practitioners several times before referral or investigation.

Conclusions: We have demonstrated the feasibility of individually randomising patients at higher risk of lung cancer, to a trial offering urgent investigation or usual care.

Read the full abstract here

Commissioning groups’ performance on cancer care in England

Edwards, N. (2016) BMJ355:i5554

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It doesn’t look good, but CCGs are only one part of the pathway

NHS England, the body responsible for overseeing local clinical commissioning groups (CCGs), recently published information on how these groups are performing on cancer care. The results were not good. Almost nine out of 10 CCGs were failing (180/209) with only 14% (29) doing well or better.

But beyond the headline figures, these results tell us more about the mess that remains following the 2012 Health and Social Care Act and about how policy makers are running out of ideas on how to make change happen.

The measures cover four indicators. On average CCGs had 50% of cancers diagnosed at stage 1 or 2—showing improvement, but some way from the 2020 target of 62% specified by the independent cancer task force that informed NHS England’s strategy. Only three CCGs came close, with the worst performing CCGs managing just over 30%.

Average one year survival for all cancers is just under 70%, but with a spread of 10 percentage points between the best and worst performing CCGs (64% to 74%). The survival target for 2020 is 75%. Patient experience was high compared with hospital services more generally, at 88%, but varies widely (67% to 96%).

Read the full editorial here

HPV cervical cancer test introduced in England

BBC Health News. Published online: 4 July 2016

Illustration showing an artists interpretation of a Cervical cancer cell

The NHS in England is introducing a “superior” test for cervical cancer, following a successful pilot programme. Experts say it is a switch that could pick up an extra 600 cancers a year.

Women invited for a routine smear test will now automatically be checked for an infection called HPV (Human Papilloma Virus), which has been strongly linked to cervical cancer. Until now, an HPV test has only been done if doctors noticed abnormal cells in the smear sample.

Public Health Minister for England Jane Ellison said: “These changes are a breakthrough in the way we test women for cervical disease. The new test is more accurate, more personal and will reduce anxiety among women.

Read the full news story here