Mental health services: cost-effective commissioning

Return on investment resources to support local commissioners in designing and implementing mental health and wellbeing support services. | Public Health England

Public Health England has produced a series of resources around mental health services.

The commissioning report summarizes the evidence on promoting good mental health and reducing the impact of poor mental health, generated through a rapid evidence review.

The return on investment (ROI) tool and user guide:

  • builds on the evidence in the commissioning report
  • can be adapted to local conditions
  • presents results showing the economic benefits of each intervention
  • show you how to use the ROI tool

The barriers and facilitator report identifies issues that can make the commissioning of mental health and wellbeing interventions easier or more difficult in a local area.

Local authorities, clinical commissioning groups, Health and Wellbeing Boards and their local partners (for example schools, employers, police) can use these set of resources to improve the provision of mental health services.

The documnets can be accessedd via Public Health England

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Sexual health, reproductive health and HIV: commissioning review

Findings and action plan from a national survey of commissioning arrangements for sexual health, reproductive health and HIV. | Public Health England

In 2016 Public Health England (PHE) and the Association of Directors of Public Health (ADPH), supported by NHS England and NHS Clinical Commissioners, carried out a survey of local authorities, NHS England and Clinical Commissioning Groups (CCGs) to highlight areas of challenge within the commissioning framework.

The survey findings form the basis of an action plan published within the review. Appendix 1 provides a detailed analysis of the survey responses and appendix 2 details the action plan to respond to the challenges identified.

Full report: Sexual health, reproductive health and HIV: commissioning review

Elective care: model access policy

We’ve produced this policy in response to requests from providers and wider health systems for guidance and support in producing their own elective access policies | NHS Improvement

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The purpose of this policy is to ensure all patients requiring access to outpatient appointments, diagnostics and elective inpatient or day-case treatment are managed in line with national waiting time standards and the NHS Constitution.

The policy:

  • is designed to ensure the management of elective patient access to services is transparent, fair, equitable and managed according to clinical priorities
  • sets out the principles and rules for managing patients through their elective care pathway
  • applies to all clinical and administrative staff, and services relating to elective patient access at the trust

Access the full policy here

Where next for commissioning?

Councillor Izzi Seccombe, chairman of the Local Government Association Wellbeing Board, shares her view on where next for commissioning as part of Provider Voices – a new publication series from NHS Providers.

Local government has been actively commissioning services for decades and sees commissioning as a continuous ongoing process, which starts with an assessment of needs, followed by an identification of priorities, market and demand management, contract development and procurement. The NHS sometimes focuses narrowly on procurement, and would benefit from adopting a whole-cycle approach.

Commissioning is far wider than contracting and procurement. Assessing the quality and outcomes of commissioned services is vital to ensure value for public money and to inform future commissioning decisions.

Local government is moving away from commissioning activities or input towards commissioning for outcomes. This approach is person-centred and doesn’t just treat individual health conditions. Its focus is on what matters to the individual: what makes their life worthwhile, and what they want to get out of their life.

Read the full post here

Cancer in the West Midlands

This report provides an overview of the burden of cancer and the extent of the identified risk factors, across the West Midlands. | Public Health England

The aim of this report is to equip care providers and policy makers with an insight into the burden of cancer, as well as providing an overview of the extent of the identified risk factors, across the West Midlands population.

It is intended to be used by commissioners of health services to enable more timely diagnosis and improve treatment pathways, and also by local authority commissioners in terms of the wider prevention agenda.

Full document:  Cancer in the West Midlands.

 

Struggling GP trainees given option to extend training for up to 18 months

Trainee GPs that struggle to meet required levels after the standard three years of training will now be able to extend their training by up to 18 months, Health Education England (HEE) has said | GP Online

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GP trainess who fail one or more exams at the end of their usual three years will be able to extend their training by 12 months, with a further exceptional six months. The move brings GP trainees more in-line with other medical specialties, which are currently allowed to extend their training by 12 months with a further exceptional 12 months.

The BMA welcomed the change, as it warned current system ‘unfairly disadvantage’ some of the more diverse groups of doctors. It is hoped the change will help prevent doctors who initially struggle to pass exams being lost to the profession.

The announcement comes alongside a commitment to make it easier for doctors from other specialties to enter GP training.

Read the full news story here

Delivering high quality end of life care for people who have a learning disability

This guidance document provide resources and tips for commissioners, service providers and health and social care staff providing, or delivering care to people with a learning disability at the end of their lives | NHS England

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Image source: NHS England

This ‘top tips’ guide aims to support commissioners, providers and clinicians to reduce inequalities in palliative and end of life for people with a learning disability, focusing on ‘The Ambitions for Palliative and End of Life Care’. These six ambitions provide a framework for national and local health and care system leaders to take action to improve palliative and end of life care. Developed by 27 organisations across the palliative and end of life care system, these ambitions set out what high quality palliative
and end of life care looks like. The ambitions call on leaders from every part of the health and caresystem, and the wider community, to put the framework into practice.

This ‘top tips’ guidance has been developed by NHS England in association with the Palliative Care for People with Learning Disabilities (PCPLD) Network. The development process involved consultation with Public Health England and a range of commissioners, providers and professionals working within palliative and end of life care and learning disability settings. People with lived experience have also helped us to develop the guide.