Excellence In Diabetes Care Commissioning

NHSCC launch new report on excellence in diabetes care commissioning | NHSCC

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Image source: NHSCC

The document draws out lessons from those involved in the projects to share and embed for the future. Since 1996 the number of people living with diabetes in the UK has more than doubled. The NHS is now spending more than £9.8bn each year on treating the condition and its complications.

The new report Excellence in commissioning diabetes care features a range of programmes from CCGs across the country with case studies including:

  • Slough CCG’s approach involving both targeted support for communities and education in GP practices – the CCG is ranked second best in the country on delivering the eight care processes identified by the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence as representing good practice in diabetes care.
  • Surrey Downs CCG’s work to improve communication between GP practices and paramedics in relation to incidences of hypoglycaemia.
  • Aylesbury Vale and Chiltern CCGs’ joint approach to diabetes care, which focuses on what the patient wants to achieve rather than only their blood sugar levels.

The report is available to download here

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Commissioning diabetes care

NHS Clinical Commissioners has published Excellence in commissioning diabetes care.  This report provides examples of where clinically led commissioning is changing the way diabetes care is commissioned and improving people’s lives. 

Since 1996 the number of people living with diabetes in the UK has more than doubled. The NHS is now spending more than £9.8bn each year on treating the condition and its complications.

The new report features a range of programmes from CCGs across the country with case studies including:

  • Slough CCG’s approach involving both targeted support for communities and education in GP practices – the CCG is ranked second best in the country on delivering the eight care processes identified by the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence as representing good practice in diabetes care.
  • Surrey Downs CCG’s work to improve communication between GP practices and paramedics in relation to incidences of hypoglycaemia.
  • Aylesbury Vale and Chiltern CCGs’ joint approach to diabetes care, which focuses on what the patient wants to achieve rather than only their blood sugar levels.

The report contains tips on commissioning excellent diabetes care including: involving patients in their own care; collaborating with providers on the move from activity to outcomes based approaches and using data effectively to demonstrate the case for change.

Hulll CCG pools entire budget with council in £600m fund

A Yorkshire clinical commissioning group is aligning its entire budget with a local authority to create a strategic commissioning fund of £600m | HSJ

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  • Hull CCG to align entire £400m budget with local authority
  • CCG chief officer joins Hull City Council’s corporate management team
  • Committee in common will approve decisions by new integrated commissioning board

Read the full article here

New NHS treatment guidelines introduced in Doncaster

Local clinicians agree changes with immediate effect | Doncaster CCG

A number of operations and procedures which medical experts agree provide only limited or temporary benefit to patients will no longer be routinely available to Doncaster patients on the NHS.

NHS Doncaster Clinical Commissioning Group (CCG) has drawn up a list of procedures, which are judged to have ’limited clinical value’. They will start to come into effect this month, following a review of national and regional treatment guidelines by local GPs and hospital clinicians.

The procedures will not be stopped altogether but they will only be funded when appropriate for the patient, after certain ‘thresholds’ have been met:

  • Benign skin lesion (non-cancerous)
  • Cholecystectomy (removal of the gall bladder)
  • Interventional treatment for haemorrhoids (piles)
  • Hernia repair (inguinal, umbilical, para-umbilical, incisional)
  • Cataract surgery
  • Hip replacement for osteoarthritis
  • knee replacement for osteoarthritis
  • Carpal tunnel syndrome
  • Common hand conditions (Dupuytren’s, trigger finger, ganglion)
  • Acupuncture for low back pain and sciatica

Patients who are currently on a waiting list to have any of the procedures will not be affected; the changes only apply to new referrals.

Read the full overview here

 

The Impact of Walk-in Centres and GP Co-operatives on Emergency Department Presentations

Crawford, J. et al. International Emergency Nursing | Published online: 18 April 2017

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Image source: Kake – Flickr // CC BY-NC-SA 2.0

Highlights:

  • Workload and resource pressures on EDs require the development of applicable minor illness and injury pathways.
  • Walk-in-centres have the potential to reduce ED workloads but more work is required to substantiate this pathway.
  • GP cooperatives can reduce ED workloads but further evidence is required to be confident of the efficacy of this care pathway.

Read the full abstract here

Reducing the impact of serious infections CQUIN

Resources to support delivery of the ‘Reducing the impact of serious infections (antimicrobial resistance and sepsis)’ CQUIN, parts 2c and 2d | NHS Improvement

  • Reducing the impact of serious infections CQUIN, parts 2c and 2d – questions and answersPDF, 185.4 KB – Questions and answers relating to parts 2c and 2d of the ‘Reducing the impact of serious infections’ CQUIN.
  • Part 2c data collection and submissionXLSX, 236.1 KB – PHE has developed this submission tool (and sample data collection form) to facilitate the submission of part 2c (antibiotic review). All data submitted will be available on AMR Fingertips.
  • Part 2d antibiotic consumption submission toolXLSM, 91.4 KB – The data submitted as part of this year’s antimicrobial resistance (AMR) CQUIN has been used to develop this baseline data. Providers that did not take part in the 2016/17 AMR CQUIN or submitted previous annual data should submit quarterly data from January to December 2016, using the antibiotic consumption spreadsheets available on the NHS England AMR CQUIN webpage. Without this data a baseline cannot be calculated for your provider.
  • Part 2d baseline dataXLS, 259.5 KB – Use this to submit quarterly antibiotic consumption data to PHE. All data once submitted will be available via AMR Fingertips after an eight week data cleaning period.

Dementia: Best practice repository for clinical commissioning

NHS England has developed a repository of examples and case studies of best practice, which is available via the online Learning Environment.

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In March 2016, NHS England introduced a new CCG Improvement and Assessment Framework (CCG IAF). This framework brings together a range of key indicators, enabling NHS England and CCGs to work together to drive improvement for patients.
The CCG IAF framework has indicators for six national clinical priority areas, including dementia. The dementia indicators are:

  • Estimated diagnosis rate for people with dementia.
  • Dementia care planning and post-diagnostic support.

NHS England recognises that CCGs will have varying levels of need for support based on their performance against the indicators, and in October 2016 published a support offer to help with this.

To substantiate the support offer, the NHS England Dementia Team has developed the Best Practice Repository on the NHS England Learning Environment website. This repository is currently being developed and case studies will be added to the NHS England Learning Environment website along with links to other resources.

View an overview of the resource here

Search for case studies here