Nearly six in ten CCGs missing talking therapies targets

Almost six in ten clinical commissioning groups are missing targets on access to talking therapies, according to official figures | OnMedica

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Mental health charity Mind said this morning that the “unacceptable” figures reflect years of mental health services being “woefully underfunded”, and insisted that it is vital that quality, timely services must be in place to meet increasing demand.

Mind said the new data, from NHS England’s mental health dashboard on how CCGs are performing with regard to delivering talking therapies, highlight the proportion of CCGs meeting and missing their targets. These most recent available data, which are for Q3 (October-December) 2016, showed that 120 out of 209 CCGs in England (57%) are failing to meet the target for the proportion of people in their area that should be accessing talking therapies – currently set at 15.8% of the local population who have been identified as being able to benefit from talking therapies. By 2021, this target is set to rise to 25%.

The figures also revealed that barely half (52%) of CCGs met the recovery rate target for talking therapies – 101 out of 209 CCGs missed the current recovery target, which is set at 50%.

Mind pointed out that these data specifically focus on therapies available through the Improving Access to Psychological Therapies (IAPT) programme, which is supposed to increase accessibility of talking treatments to those identified as potentially benefitting from receiving them (typically, people with common mental health problems such as depression and anxiety disorder).

Missing data has risked GPs’ patient care

Missing patient data that was mistakenly held in storage for years has led to around 1,700 cases of potential harm caused to GPs’ patients, according to a report published today by the National Audit Office (NAO) | OnMedica

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The NAO’s Investigation: clinical correspondence handling at NHS Shared Business Services report details the watchdog’s investigation into how NHS Shared Business Services (NHS SBS) – an agency contracted by the government to run some back-office operations in the NHS – handled unprocessed clinical correspondence.

Significant amounts of important data on patients including test results and diagnoses were delayed mistakenly between 2011 and 2016 by the NHS Shared Business Services agency before they were delivered to hospitals and GP surgeries.

This data, which included copies of test or screening results, and communications about planned treatment following appointments with other healthcare providers, was sent by hospitals and other GPs to practices where the patient had moved away or was unknown, so needed to be redirected.

Patient and service-provider perspectives for treating primary care complaints in urgent care settings

An investigation into why patients chose to attend two, nurse-led, minor injury units (MIUs) to access primary healthcare services rather than attend their GP practice | International Emergency Nursing

Highlights:

  • Patients with non-urgent conditions are increasingly attending urgent care providers in the UK.
  • Consumerist notions of choice and expediency influence healthcare decision making.
  • Patients seem to be acting rationally in response to healthcare policy promises.
  • Providing treatment establishes precedent and expectation for future care.
  • Co-located primary care, working alongside ENP services, offer benefits for local communities.

Full reference: Sturgeon, D. (2017) Convenience, quality and choice: Patient and service-provider perspectives for treating primary care complaints in urgent care settings. International Emergency Nursing. Published online: 26 June 2017

Checklist For Recruiting CCG Lay Members

This checklist aims to support CCGs with recruiting lay members and provides a series of questions that can be asked to start conversations about both recruitment and succession planning | NHS Clinical Commissioners

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Image course: NHSCC

Lay members bring an essential independent perspective to the clinical commissioning group (CCG) governing body – being separate to the day-to-day running of the organisation means that they can see it as it is seen from the outside. This checklist from the NHS Clinical Commissioners (NHSCC) Lay Members Network is the first in a series looking at different aspects of the lay member role. Aimed at CCG chairs, members of the CCG governing body and lay members, it provides a series of questions that can be asked to start conversations about recruitment and succession planning.

 

Autism Self-Assessment Framework Exercise

This report presents the findings from the fourth autism self-assessment exercise carried out by local authorities (LAs) between July and November 2016 | PHE

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Image source: PHE

It shows the LAs progress towards meeting the requirements of the Autism Act. The report is accompanied by personal stories from self-advocates, their families’ and carers.

As a result of the Autism Act (2), the first Adult Autism Strategy (Fulfilling and Rewarding lives) was published in 2010 (3). This was followed by a new and updated strategy – Think Autism in 2014 (6). The purpose of the self-assessment was to enable local strategy groups to review their progress and support future planning with partners including people with autism and their families.

This was the fourth autism self-assessment framework. The baseline self-assessment was carried out in 2011, followed by updates in 2013 and 2014. These exercises allow local authorities and their partners to monitor their progress in implementing the  utism Strategy. Through greater transparency they also enable adults with autism, their families and carers, and autism representative groups to see what progress is being made. The self-assessment data offers an opportunity to compare local authority areas and develop benchmarks. It can assist in identifying areas where further action is needed and in planning improvements.

Video: What on earth is a vanguard?

Cutting through modern-day NHS jargon is no mean feat, but one up-and-coming TV broadcaster has succeeded where the Jeremy Paxmans of this world have failed… meet Healthwatch Harriet | NHS England

The tenacious 10-year-old has turned her sights on the NHS England new care models programme. In her new video, she meets new care models programme director Louise Watson, chair of Tower Hamlets CCG Sir Sam Etherington, and Hertfordshire County Council’s director of health and community services Iain MacBeath and asks them: “What on earth is a vanguard?”

Read the full news story here

NHS Urgent Medicine Supply Advanced Service Pilot

A practical guide on how to deliver the NHS Urgent Medicine Supply Advanced Service | NHS England

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This toolkit is a practical guide on how to deliver the service, including a step-by-step
guide on how to provide the service, record service delivery and claim service
payments.

The toolkit does not replace the formal contractual arrangement between the
pharmacy and NHS England to provide the service. Pharmacy staff must make sure
that they work within the service specification provided by NHS England, the
Directions published by the Department of Health and within professional practice,
guidance and other legislation.