6

Welcome to the Commissioning News online newsfeed. Here you’ll find all the latest research, news stories, policy updates and guidelines. View our other newsfeeds for more subject-specific news.

Advertisements

Cancer screening: informed consent

Public Health England has updated the Cancer Screening: Informed consent guidelines.

These guidelines give commissioners, providers and healthcare professionals in cancer screening information on consent to screening and procedures.

The document covers information and advice on:

  • breast screening
  • cervical screening
  • bowel cancer screening
  • mental capacity and consent

It also provides several template letters for patients withdrawing from programmes.

Commissioning mental health services in primary care

Of primary importance: commissioning mental health services in primary care  | NHS Clinical Commissioners

This report highlights projects where CCGs and their partners are delivering better care for patients, working across the boundaries between physical and mental health, as well as health and social care, while at the same time reducing pressure on GPs and hospitals.

Developed by NHS Clinical Commissioner’s Mental Health Commissioners Network, the report aims to share learning and good practice from these projects to help support others looking to implement projects across primary care.

Case studies in the report include:

  • Community Living Well in West London which helps those with long-term mental health conditions and covers a full range of psychological therapies from guided self-help, through to sessions of short-term psychodynamic or CBT, carers therapy and a wellbeing service.
  • Work in Sheffield where IAPT workers are attached to each of the CCG’s individual 85 practices, and are incorporated as part of the practice multidisciplinary team.
  • The Well Centre, a primary care health centre in Lambeth for young people aged 13 to 20 offering support with all areas of health including mental wellbeing.

Full report available here

Collaboration in general practice

Collaboration in general practice: Surveys of GP practices and clinical commissioning groups | Nuffield Trust |  Royal College of General Practitioners

This report summarises the results of two surveys, sent to general practice staff and to CCG staff, aimed at finding out what had changed in the landscape of general practice since the previous surveys two years ago and to explore what GPs feel the future holds for them.

Key findings include:

  • The scaling up of general practice continues apace with 81% of general practice-based respondents reporting that they were part of a formal or informal collaboration, up from 73% in 2015.
  • However, the landscape is complex. Practices often belong to multiple collaborations that operate at different levels in the system, having been set up to fulfil different purposes.
  • The main priorities of all collaborations over the last year were: increasing access for patients, improving sustainability, and shifting services into the community. The priorities differed by size of collaboration. Both providers and commissioners reported that time and work pressures were the biggest challenge to collaborations achieving their aims.
  • When asked about developments in their local area, over half of GP staff and one-third of CCG staff surveyed felt practices and collaborations had not been at all influential in shaping the local sustainability and transformation partnership (STP). Only one-fifth of GPs thought STPs would deliver meaningful change in primary care. CCGs were more optimistic, with 61% reporting that meaningful change was probable.
  • When questioned about future models of care, around half of practice partners (53%) said they would be ‘unwilling’ or ‘very unwilling’ to give up their current GMS/PMS/APMS contract1 to join a new models contract (e.g. MCP or PACS contract2). The most common reason they gave was that they did not want to lose control of decision-making and leadership in their practice.

The report can be downloaded here

Musculoskeletal conditions: return on investment tool

Return on Investment of Interventions for the Prevention and Treatment of Musculoskeletal Conditions | Public Health England

This tool has been designed to aid healthcare commissioners and providers in England who wish to assess the cost-effectiveness of interventions for the prevention musculoskeletal (MSK) conditions.

It is hoped that the tool will aid decision-making and increase the uptake of cost-effective interventions aimed at the prevention of MSK conditions. Conditions within the scope of this tool are: Lower back pain; chronic knee pain and osteoarthritis (hip and knee).

Full detail at Public Health England

Alcohol, drugs and tobacco: commissioning support pack

Annually updated alcohol, drugs and tobacco commissioning support pack for local authorities | Public Health England

This commissioning support pack will help local authorities to develop joint strategic needs assessment and local joint health and wellbeing strategies which effectively address public health issues relating to alcohol, drug and tobacco use.

The pack covers 4 topics, which are:

  • planning alcohol harm prevention, treatment and recovery in adults
  • planning drugs prevention, treatment and recovery in adults
  • planning comprehensive interventions for young people
  • planning comprehensive local tobacco control interventions

For each of these topics, there are:

  • a set of good practice principles and indicators to help local areas assess need and plan and commission effective services and interventions
  • bespoke data for each local area to help them commission effective services and interventions

Documents available via Public Health England

Strategic commissioning

Steering towards strategic commissioning: transforming the system | NHS Clinical Commissioners

Clinical commissioners are playing a key role as architects of the changing health and care landscape, analysis shows. A new publication by NHS Clinical Commissioners sets out CCGs’ vision for the future and what they need to get there at pace so they can deliver more for patients.

steering

Image source: http://www.nhscc.org/

Steering towards strategic commissioning shows there is a strong belief that healthcare commissioning must continue to be clinically led, operate at a scale larger than a CCG footprint, retain its purchasing function and remain accountable to the local population.

The analysis, which was informed by a survey and interviews with CCG leaders, shows that CCGs are embracing change, with 77 per cent of those surveyed intending to contract for a new care model in 2017/18, and 72 per cent planning on increasing their collaborative commissioning.

Related: The Changing Commissioning Landscape

Depression in children and young people

NICE has published a guideline on identifying and managing depression in children and young people aged between 5 and 18 years.

This guideline covers identifying and managing depression in children and young people aged between 5 and 18 years. Based on the stepped care model, it aims to improve recognition and assessment and promote effective treatments for mild, moderate and severe depression.

nice-logo

Image source: www.nice.org.uk

This guideline includes recommendations on:

Full guideline: Depression in children and young people: identification and management